07 July 2010

Greek Corner


Greek Corner is a tastefully appointed Greek restaurant in Upper Arlington. The UA location is the second Greek Corner; the first is located on Dublin Granville Road in Dublin. As with most Greek restaurants, Greek Corner features a wide variety of appetizers and entrees for vegetarian diners.

Having never been to the Dublin location of Greek Corner, it is difficult for me to compare the two locations. The Upper Arlington location is intimate. The interior showcases wood accents, and there is ample bar seating.

Greek Corner utilizes one of my favorite vegetarian helpers: all vegetarian dishes are marked with a double asterisk. Vegetarian starters include spanakopita, saganaki, Italian eggplant, falafel, hummus, skordalia and a Greek salad. Vegetarian entrees include many sandwiches, such as a falafel pita, a veggie pita and a veggie panini, as well as entrees like stuffed peppers and vegetarian Greek pasta.

I tried a few different starters. The skordalia showcased deep garlic flavors and a light, whipped potato character. It paired well with the warm pita triangles. The only complaint I had was that the potatoes were whipped a little too heavily, making the dip somewhat airy. The flavor, however, was excellent.

The saganaki, a classic dish, was very good. The cheese was hot, and the lemon juice used to quell the flames added a subtle citrus note to the flavor profile.

The Greek salad was typical of the style. It was made with feta cheese and kalamata olives in the classic Greek style.

The vegetarian stuffed pepper, while it is not the most traditional Greek dish, was prepared with enough Greek accents to give it a Hellenic flair. The pepper was stuffed with tomato, red pepper, rice and feta cheese, and it was served with a side of steamed, mixed vegetables. The dish was fresh, flavorful and delicious.

Greek Corner has a full bar, and they offer a wide variety of Greek wines and beers. Business seems to be busier at lunchtime than at dinner.


Greek Corner

Greek Corner on Urbanspoon

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Note to reviewer and aspiring food critic -- while skordalia is sometimes eaten with potatoes, it is not made with potatoes. Rather, it is made with bread, garlic, hot water, salt, olive oil and lemon juice.
This is a very nice Greek restaurant, and the tzatziki is EXCELLENT.

Anonymous said...

Note to reviewer and aspiring food critic -- while skordalia is sometimes eaten with potatoes, it is not made with potatoes. Rather, it is made with bread, garlic, hot water, salt, olive oil and lemon juice.
This is a very nice Greek restaurant, and the tzatziki is EXCELLENT.
Opa!

deraj1013 said...

That's interesting...and very wrong. According to Wikipedia:

"Skordalia or skordhalia/skorthalia) is a thick puree (or sauce, dip, spread, etc.) in Greek cuisine made by combining crushed garlic with a bulky base—which may be a purĂ©e of potatoes, walnuts, almonds, or liquid-soaked stale bread—and then beating in olive oil to make a smooth emulsion."

Skordalia is made with potatoes in almost every restaurant I have ever worked in or eaten at.

deraj1013 said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skordalia